Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg

Vorträge, Seminare, Ereignisse

A list of all Physics & Astronomy talks and seminars taking place in Heidelberg can be found at HePhySTO.


Upcoming events


2022-09-30
11:00
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A Tapestry of Starlight and Supermassive Black Holes
Alyssa Drake (Hertfordshire)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
MPIA lecture hall,
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As new astronomical facilities come online, they offer the opportunity to transform our understanding of the Universe. One such facility is The International LOFAR Telescope, which is opening new parameter space in the low-frequency radio sky through its unprecedented combination of sensitivity, areal coverage and spatial resolution. In particular, the LOFAR Two Metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) is surveying the entire northern sky at 150MHz to a depth of ~100 micro Jy, already providing a sample of > 4 million extragalactic radio sources, and gathering statistical samples of both extreme quasars in the early Universe, and 'typical' star-forming galaxies across vast swathes of cosmic time. I will outline our current understanding of the build up of the first supermassive black holes, and the evolution of cosmic star formation, using state-of-the art facilities (e.g. MUSE and ALMA), before discussing how the advent of massively-multiplexed spectroscopic facilities such as WEAVE will unlock the immense potential of the LOFAR surveys. For instance, by providing > 1 million optical spectra of radio-selected sources, the WEAVE-LOFAR survey will be able to distinguish between star-formation and AGN, accretion modes in AGN, and ultimately enable us to understand the complex interplay between star formation and accretion from z~7 to the present day.

2022-10-07
11:00
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Ralf Klessen (ITA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-10-07
11:00
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Ralf Klessen (ITA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-10-07
11:00
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Ralf Klessen (ITA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-10-07
11:00
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Ralf Klessen (ITA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-10-14
11:00
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Sabine Thater (University Vienna)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-10-14
11:00
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Sabine Thater (University Vienna)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-10-14
11:00
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Sabine Thater (University Vienna)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-10-14
11:00
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Sabine Thater (University Vienna)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-10-20
11:15
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Classification of emission-line nebulae in the PHANGS-MUSE sample: a Bayesian approach
Enrico Congiu (University of Chile)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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The PHANGS-MUSE survey offers us an unprecedented view of the ionized interstellar medium of nearby star-forming galaxies. The high spatial resolution (ca.50 pc) allows us to identify and isolate single emitting clouds, while the broad spectral range offers us the opportunity to study their properties in detail. However, a correct classification of the nebulae (e.g., HII regions, planetary nebulae, supernova remnants) is critical to studying them and their role in galaxy evolution. Many classification schemes have been developed in the literature in the last few decades. Still, none of them can take advantage of all the information provided by modern integral field spectrographs like MUSE at the VLT. In this talk, I will present the results of a new algorithm that aims to reliably and objectively classify nebulae using the Bayesian principle of the odds ratio to compare spectral and morphological properties of each region to models representing different classes of nebulae. This algorithm is applied to the nebulae identified in the PHANGS-MUSE survey to produce the most extensive catalog of classified ionized nebulae available in the literature.

2022-10-21
11:00
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TBC
Deanne Fisher (Swinburne U.)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-10-21
11:00
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Deanne Fisher (Swinburne U.)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-10-21
11:00
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Deanne Fisher (Swinburne U.)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-10-21
11:00
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Deanne Fisher (Swinburne U.)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-10-21
11:00
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Caroline Gieser (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-10-27
11:15
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HEALpix and MOC: Get into shape on the sky
Markus Demleitner (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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HEALpixes are a powerful method of dividing the sky into equiangular regions and cleverly enumerating them. In particular when doing statistical analyses over larger areas of the sky, there rarely is a good reason to invent any other scheme – indeed, if you have ever done non-trivial things with Gaia source_ids, you have worked with HEALPixes. On top of them, the Virtual Observatory has defined Multi-Order Coverage maps, or MOCs for short. These turn dealing with complicated, possibly non-connected areas on the sky from an extremely painful exercise into simple operations between integer sets. You can now use both of these things from ADQL (at least on some TAP servers), and you can use them to plot your results in TOPCAT (or pyVO). This talk will show you how.

2022-10-28
11:00
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Niv Drory (U. of Texas/Austin)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-10-28
11:00
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Niv Drory (U. of Texas/Austin)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-10-28
11:00
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Niv Drory (U. of Texas/Austin)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-10-28
11:00
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Niv Drory (U. of Texas/Austin)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-11-03
11:15
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Molecular gas and star formation histories in void galaxies
Jesus Dominguez Gomez (University of Granada)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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Galaxies in the Universe are not distributed uniformly, but rather in a web-like structure char- acterised by dense clusters, elongated filaments, sheetlike walls, and under-dense regions in between, called voids. Galaxies in voids are on average bluer, less massive, have later morphological types, and have higher star formation rates than galaxies in denser environments. Simulations show that different gas accretion modes dominate in each environment and the halo-to-stellar mass ratio is higher in void galaxies compared to galaxies in denser environments. This suggests that galaxies in voids evolve slower. Here I present results related to the molecular gas mass and star formation histories of galaxies in the voids, filaments, walls and clusters, trying to unveil the effect of the large-scale environment on galaxy evolution.

2022-11-04
11:00
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TBD
Mateusz Ruszkowski (University of Michigan)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-11-04
11:00
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Mateusz Ruszkowski (University of Michigan)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-11-04
11:00
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Mateusz Ruszkowski (University of Michigan)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-11-04
11:00
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Mateusz Ruszkowski (University of Michigan)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-11-10
11:15
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Caroline Bertemes (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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2022-11-17
11:15
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Dark matter and angular momentum in nearby disc galaxies
Pavel Mancera Pina (Leiden Observatory)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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Dark matter and angular momentum are key parameters regulating the evolution of galaxies through cosmic time: they largely control their total mass, size, and morphology. During the last years, we have exploited exquisite observations and state-of-the-art analysis tools to robustly measure the motions of the cold gas in disc galaxies, which in turn allows us to infer their dark matter and angular momentum. This talk will be divided into three main parts. In the first part, I will focus on the startling dynamics of gas-rich ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs). UDGs are very peculiar systems: they have similar effective radii as big spirals like the Milky Way but about 1000 times fewer stars, making them very diffuse. By carefully modelling their gas kinematics, we found that our galaxies rotate much slower than other galaxies with similar baryonic mass, making them strong outliers of the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. Moreover, our UDGs have baryon fractions as high as the cosmological average, and they appear to have dark matter distributions challenging to explain in the Cold Dark Matter model. In the second part of the talk, I will present some of the most detailed measurements of the baryonic specific angular momentum of nearby disc galaxies to date. We discovered a new relationship between the baryonic mass, baryonic specific angular momentum, and gas content; this is one of the tightest known scaling relations of disc galaxies. Finally, in the last part of the talk, I will show our recent and accurate determinations of the dark matter content in a sample of nearby galaxies. For the first time, we systematically accounted for the fact that their gaseous discs are not razor-thin but thick and flared, which allowed us to obtain some of the most detailed estimations of the dark matter content in nearby galaxies. We also revisited baryonic and dark matter scaling relations, finding evidence of feedback processes imprinting signatures on them.

2022-11-18
11:00
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Unveiling the complexities of massive star clusters
Richard de Grijs (Macquarie U.)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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Around the turn of the last century, star clusters of all kinds were considered ‘simple' stellar populations. Over the past decade, this situation has changed dramatically. At the same time, star clusters are among the brightest stellar population components and, as such, they are visible out to much greater distances than individual stars, even the brightest, so that understanding the intricacies of star cluster composition and their evolution is imperative for understanding stellar populations and the evolution of galaxies as a whole. In this review of where the field has moved to in recent years, we place particular emphasis on the properties and importance of the effects of rapid stellar rotation, and the presence of multiplicity among the red-giant-branch populations in Magellanic Cloud star clusters with ages up to a few billion years.

2022-11-24
11:15
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On the origin of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters
Silvia Martocchi (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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Globular clusters (GCs) are very dense agglomerates of hundreds of thousands stars and they host some of the oldest known stars in our Universe. Their formation is one of the current outstanding problems in astronomy. GCs were traditionally thought to be simple stellar systems, assuming that all the stars within a given cluster were born at the same time and have the same chemical composition. However, already in the ‘70s, light-element abundance variations (e.g. He, C, N, Na, O) within GCs stars were discovered thanks to spectroscopy and photometry. A typical GC optical and near-UV color-magnitude diagram shows discrete multiple sequences at almost any evolutionary stage, which indicate the presence of multiple stellar populations (MPs). This has led to a new paradigm in our understanding of GC formation, which is intimately linked to the formation of stars and the assembly of galaxies. Indeed, GCs were once thought to form in special conditions, only present in the early Universe. The discovery of young GCs, forming in nearby galaxies, has opened a new window on the problem, allowing us to directly search for the origin of MPs. In this talk, I will present an overview of the MPs problem in GCs. I will report on the latest findings from both an observational and theoretical point of view, with a major accent on the discovery of such a phenomenon in young and intermediate age GCs. Finally, open questions and possible ways forward onto the MPs problem will be discussed.

2022-11-25
11:00
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Award celebration
Patzer colloquium
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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The award winner will present their work.

2022-11-25
11:00
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Award celebration
Patzer colloquium
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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The award winner will present their work.

2022-11-25
11:00
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Award celebration
Patzer colloquium
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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The award winner will present their work.

2022-11-25
11:00
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Award celebration
Patzer colloquium
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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Abstract
The award winner will present their work.

2022-12-01
11:15
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Mapping intrinsic Ly-alpha halos of high-redshift AGN with MUSE
Wuji Wang (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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High-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) have powerful AGN and are hosted by some of the most massive galaxies. They are surrounded by an enriched CGM allowing us to study feeding/feedback processes at and beyond Cosmic Noon. To understand the role of the CGM thoroughly, we observed a sample of eight HzRGs (2.92<z<4.51) with MUSE. In addition to the prominent Ly-alpha line, several UV emission lines (e.g. NV and CIV) are also captured and present absorption features. In our pilot study, we map the absorption- corrected halo of a z ca.4.5 redshift radio galaxy and find evidence that AGN feedback may play an important role in redistributing material and metals on CGM scale (Wang et al. 2021). In this talk, I will present the results of this technique applied to the full MUSE sample, i.e. mapping the intrinsic Ly-alpha emission halos of our HzRGs. The developed smoothing+tessellation technique for MUSE (or IFU) data allows us to capture faint and extended halo emission (7 have halos >100kpc) only limited by the data depth. HI Lya absorption features are often interpreted as radiative transfer effect. Seeing them in both hydrogen and metals, we argue that they are due to absorbing gas and must be considered in CGM analysis. In this way, we can decipher the morphological and kinematical information of the kpc-scale halos linking this with the feedback. Four of our HzRGs will be observed with JWST/NIRSpec, which will enable us to explore feedback from the vicinity of the central engine and study its propagation through the host galaxy and beyond into the CGM at larger scales.

2022-12-02
11:00
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Towards molecular complexity
Thomas Henning (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-12-02
11:00
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Towards molecular complexity
Thomas Henning (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-12-08
11:15
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The role of the star clusters in the dynamical evolution of their planets
Francesco Maria Flammini Dotti (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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The dynamical evolution of planetary systems is an important field that aims to explain how the majority of planets eventually obtain their actual architecture. In a star cluster, it may explain the diversity of their architectures due to their different encounter history. Moreover, there is a relative large abundance of free-floating planets in our galaxy. The star clusters may be a consistent source due to their ejected free- floating planets. In this talk, I will explain how the star cluster density and the presence of a cluster-centric intermediate-mass black hole eventually affects Solar-like systems (i.e., a complex planetary system) and single- planet systems respectively. Furthermore, I will introduce global rotation in the star cluster, and discuss its role in the ejection of both stars and free-floating planets. I will use NBODY6++GPU (a N-body code which performs simulations with a large number of particles, i.e., star clusters) and LonelyPlanets (another N-body code which performs simulations with a low number of particles, i.e., planetary systems). The results confirm that the density of the star cluster is one of the major characteristic in the ejection of planets from their host star, and the planetary architecture has also a predominant role. The intermediate-mass black hole enhances the ejection of planets from the planetary systems as well. Moreover, the ejection of both stars and planets from the star cluster is enhanced as well. Finally, the global rotation of star clusters diminishes the ejection of planets from their star cluster even at mid-slow rotational speeds.

2022-12-09
11:00
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HHSF2022
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-12-09
11:00
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HHSF2022
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-12-09
11:00
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HHSF2022
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2022-12-15
11:15
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Tracing the origin of galaxies beyond the Milky Way from limited observations
Sebastian Trujillo-Gomez (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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In this talk I will describe two complementary and novel approaches to understanding the assembly of galaxies beyond the MW in a cosmological context using observational tracers. In the first approach, we infer the origin of globular clusters from observables towards the goal of reconstructing the assembly histories of galaxies in upcoming wide-field surveys. Using the E-MOSAICS simulations to follow the formation and co-evolution of ca. 1000 galaxies and their star clusters, we explored the use of supervised machine learning to classify observed GCs into accreted and in-situ populations. Assessing the performance using a subset of the simulations and the known origin of the MW clusters, we obtain an accuracy of ca. 90% for 2/3 of the sample and successfully identify accreted debris buried deep within the Galaxy. In the second approach we study hundreds of high quality galaxy rotation curves to understand the impact of the large-scale environment on the structure of their host dark matter (DM) haloes. Galaxies in high density environments show a systematic shift in their DM density profile at large radii that is consistent with a relatively early assembly of their host haloes. The effect is manifest in the well known radial acceleration relation (RAR) as a slight downturn at the lowest accelerations for galaxies in dense environments. This environmental dependence can be understood in the context of assembly bias within the Lambda-CDM cosmological paradigm, implying that the RAR can provide useful constraints on the fundamental relation between dark and luminous matter.

2023-01-12
11:15
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Galactic archaeology with globular clusters in Andromeda
Ivan Cabrera-Ziri (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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2023-01-13
11:00
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SPHERE+
Markus Feldt (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2023-01-19
11:15
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What is the origin of dust in elliptical galaxies? - M87 and NGC 4696
Tom Richtler (Universidad de Conception)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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Although dust in elliptical galaxies is ubiquitous, its origin is not well understood, given the absence of young stellar populations with classical dust producers like post-AGB stars or supernovae. Many authors still promote an “external” origin through galaxy mergers. However, at least in one case, we have shown that the dust has its origin in nuclear dusty outflows (NGC 1316 or Fornax A). This talk presents two more key galaxies: M87, the central galaxy of a Virgo subcluster, and NGC 4696, the central galaxy of the Centaurus galaxy cluster. The discussion is based on HST images and on wide-field and narrow-field MUSE data cubes. In M87, dust filaments emerge from the nucleus and seemingly from jet knots. More dust than found in the literature is present, including a dust filament starting from the tip of the jet. The jet itself is fine-structured down to the HST resolution limit, so its relativistic character is in doubt. NGC 4696 shows similar dust properties. Better visible is here an optical continuum radiation from the dust which directly indicates cooling of a hot ISM in magnetic fields. All evidence support a scenario, where dust forms in situ as the final cooling product of a multi-phase magnetised ISM.

2023-01-26
11:15
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Stellar associations powering HII regions
Fabian Scheuermann (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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Newly formed stars will ionize and enrich the surrounding gas and thereby contribute to regulating the star formation cycle. However, fragmentation of the cloud means that stellar feedback is not perfectly coupled to the gas. The PHANGS survey provides a large sample of galaxies that is perfectly suited to study the different phases of the ISM, which is necessary to put constraints on this process. With PHANGS-MUSE we detect over 24,000 HII regions across 19 galaxies and with PHANGS-HST we identify a catalogue of over 15,000 compact stellar associations. Both catalogues are matched and we obtain a sample of 4,177 clearly matched HII regions and ionizing clusters. By comparing the observed Halpha flux to the number of ionizing photons predicted by stellar population synthesis models, we can quantify the leaking radiation. This allows us to measure the escape fraction for one of the largest samples of HII regions in the literature and study correlations with other properties of the cloud.

2023-02-02
11:15
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Population Analysis of Short Gamma-ray Bursts and Magnetar Giant Flares
Elisa Schoesser (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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Magnetars are highly-magnetized (ca. 1016 G) neutron stars which may randomly emit bursts of high energy radiation, in the form of hard X-rays or much more rarely giant flares of gamma-rays during their active phase. Recent observations of GRB 200415A, a short and very bright pulse of gamma-rays, have been claimed to be an extragalactic magnetar giant flare (MGF) whose host galaxy is the Sculptur Galaxy (NGC 253). However, as the redshift of the transient object was not able to be measured, it is possible that the measured location of the transient on the celestial sphere and the location of the local galaxy merely coincide. Thus, its real progenitor could have been arbitrarily far away, leaving the standard model of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), the merger of two compact objects, as an explanation for the observations. In this talk, I will present an estimate of the false-alarm rate of SGRBs being incorrectly identified as MGFs using population synthesis to simulate data collected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

2023-02-03
11:00
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Ralph Pudritz (McMaster)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2023-02-09
11:15
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Stellar feedback shaping the ionized ISM in the nearby galaxies
Oleg Egorov (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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Stellar feedback plays an important role in the regulation of the structure, kinematics and chemical abundance of the interstellar medium. Multiple stellar winds and supernovae explosions inject energy and momentum into the interstellar medium. These processes are probable drivers of the turbulence of the ISM. They can also create large holes and superbubbles with sizes varying from several pc to several kpc. Modern integral-field spectrographs allow us to study the resolved properties of the ionized gas, and the high-resolution images from space base telescopes provide information about young stars in the nearby galaxies. Thus, using the combined data set, we can connect directly the ionized gas to the young stellar population. In my talk, I will focus on how the mechanical feedback impacts the small-scale morphology and kinematics of the ISM of nearby galaxies as observed in the PHANGS-MUSE and PHANGS-HST data. Also, I will consider how the feedback from young stars affects the dust content in the nearby galaxies based on the new PHANGS-JWST observations.

2023-02-16
11:15
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Walter Dehnen (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
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