Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg

Vorträge, Seminare, Ereignisse

A list of all Physics & Astronomy talks and seminars taking place in Heidelberg can be found at HePhySTO.


Upcoming events


2022-05-24
16:00
Add to calendar (ics)
Stellar feedback: from stars to galaxies
Dr Anna McLeod (Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Durham University, UK)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12, Main Lecture Theatre
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
Feedback from massive stars plays a central role in shaping the evolution of galaxies. Conversely, different galactic environments play a central role in regulating the impact of massive stars. Yet, despite a solid qualitative understanding of feedback, our quantitative knowledge about the interdependence of feedback and environment remains poor. Until recently, only a small number of star-forming regions had adequate observational information on both gas and stars needed for detailed stellar feedback studies. Over the past decade, integral field units (IFUs) have revolutionized our approach to resolved stellar feedback studies in nearby galaxies. In this talk I will present recent results of IFU nearby galaxy surveys, showcasing how these can be used to simultaneously characterize the feedback-driven interstellar medium and individual feedback-driving stars up to Mpc distances, and I will discuss how this enables the first empirical quantification of the interdependence between stellar feedback and the environments massive stars form in. Lastly, if there is time, I will also be talking about how IFU data can lead to truly serendipitous discoveries. Dr. McLeod will be based at the Astronomisches Rechen-Institut for her visit to Heidelberg and will be available for meetings by arrangement with her host, Melanie Chevance (chevance@uni-heidelberg.de). Those unable to attend the colloquium in person are invited to participate online through Zoom (Meeting ID: 942 0262 2849, passcode 792771) using the link: https://zoom.us/j/94202622849pwd=dGlPQXBiUytzY1M2UE5oUDRhbzNOZz09

2022-05-27
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBA
Jennifer (Leigh) Wojno (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBA

2022-05-27
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
On Modelling Complex Systems in Astronomy
Yuan-Sen Ting (ANU)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
Astronomy today is fundamentally different than it was even just a decade ago. Our increasing ability to collect a large amount of data from ever more powerful instrumental has enabled many new opportunities. However, such opportunity also comes with new challenges. The bottleneck stems from the fact that most astronomical observations are inherently high dimension ? from ?imaging? the Universe at the finest details to fully characterising tens of millions of spectra consisting of tens of thousands of wavelength pixels. In this regime, classical astrostatistics approaches struggle.

I will present two different machine learning approaches to quantify complex systems in astronomy. (1) Reductionist approach: I will discuss how machine learning can optimally compress information and extract higher-order moment information in stochastic processes. (2) A generative approach: I will discuss how generative models, such as normalising flow, allow us to properly model the vast astronomy data set, enabling the study of complex astronomy systems directly in their raw dimensional space.

2022-05-31
16:00
Add to calendar (ics)
Probing the active lives of stars with space missions
Prof. Beate Stelzer (University of Tuebingen)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12, Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
Abstract to be arranged. Prof. Stelzer will be based at the MPIAstronomie for her visit to Heidelberg and will be available for meetings by arrangement with her host, Wolfgang Brandner (brandner@mpia.de).

2022-06-02
11:15
Add to calendar (ics)
The effect of pre-processing on the stellar population content of early-type dwarf galaxies
Bahar Bidaran (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
According to the ΛCDM framework, clusters grow through accretion of individual galaxies and galaxies in groups, where they may be pre-processed. It thus becomes challenging for us to isolate and study the environmental effects solely due to the cluster host halo. Dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) can provide us with statistically meaningful testbeds for investigating environmental effects thanks to their high number density and shallow potential well in the Local Universe. To study the imprint of pre-processing on the stellar population content of dEs, we analyzed a sample of nine Virgo dEs that, based on their distribution on the projected phase-space diagram and predictions from N-body simulations, have been accreted to Virgo as gravitationally bound members of a massive galaxy group, about 2-3 Gyr ago. We derived stellar population properties of these dEs (i.e., their age, [M/H] and [α/Fe]) using their MUSE spectra. We found that the dEs of our sample are considerably [α/Fe] enhanced and metal-poorer than equally-massive dEs of the Coma and Virgo clusters that have similar or even larger infall times. We also noted that 6 out of 9 dEs have experienced enhanced star formation (SF) at their accretion time or later, possibly due to shocks and thermal instabilities exerted by ram pressure inside Virgo. According to our results, the rest of our sample was accreted onto Virgo already quenched. Based on our results, we speculate that the short episode of star formation, occurred at infall into Virgo, might be responsible for the relatively high [α/Fe] ratios observed in these six dEs of our sample. Our sample of dEs exhibit on average, a negative metallicity gradient and a positive [α/Fe] gradient. Except for two dEs in our sample, the rest show a flat age gradient. These results are consistent with an inside-out formation scenario, and are in agreement with other observational and theoretical studies in the literature. In this talk, we take advantage of our results and discuss how pre-processing in previous host halos, and early processing in clusters may affect the physical properties of cluster dEs.

2022-06-03
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBD
Ilaria Pascucci (LPL, Tuscon)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBD

2022-06-03
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBD
Ilaria Pascucci (LPL, Tuscon)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBD

2022-06-09
11:15
Add to calendar (ics)
Perspectives on Massive Stars in the Local Universe and Beyond
Cormac Larkin (University of Groningen)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
Stars account for the vast majority of the light we observe from the Milky Way and beyond. A single stellar population (SSP) is a group of stars formed at the same time and with the same initial composition. By combining superpositions of SSPs representing periods of star formation, we can model a wide range of galaxies. A long-standing issue when using empirical libraries to construct SSPs is non-arbitrary coverage of the HR-diagram, which imposes implicit age limits on SSP models that can be generated. The X-shooter Spectral Library (XSL) currently has poor coverage above Tef f ∼ 10000K, limiting its applicability to young SSPs. I will discuss current efforts to populate a previously bare region of the XSL HR diagram and thus extend the lower age limit for XSL stellar population models by up to a factor ∼10 for [Fe/H] = -1.2, and a factor ∼2 for solar metallicity. Massive stars are particularly interesting at low metallicities as possible progenitors of gravitational wave sources, long-duration gamma-ray bursts and sources of cosmic reionization in the early Universe. The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at Z ∼ 0.2 Z provides the lowest metallicity environment where representative resolved populations of massive stars can be observed. I will discuss an ongoing project to find new high- significance candidate OB-type stars in the SMC. Using spectral energy distributions constructed from UV, optical and IR photometry, we have found hundreds of new candidate OB stars. Early results from spectro- scopic follow-up with Gemini-South are positive, thus potentially changing our view on the known massive stellar population in the SMC. Massive stars are also responsible for synthesising the majority of the short-lived radio-nuclides Al-26 and Fe-60 in the Galaxy. Upon decaying, they emit characteristic gamma rays which can be directly observed and mapped. While Al-26 can also be distributed by stellar winds, Fe-60 is only produced during a supernova. The comparison of both thus yields important constraints on the role and strength of stellar winds in evolved stars. I will talk about the importance of fully understanding the underlying nuclear reaction rates that create and destroy Al-26 in massive stars in order to gain a better perspective of the role of stellar winds and their yields.

2022-06-10
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
Gaia DR (TBA)
Coryn Bailer-Jones (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-06-14
16:00
Add to calendar (ics)
The Galactic Center: Infrared studies of a unique astrophysical target
Dr Rainer Schoedel (Instituto Astrofísica Andalucía, Spain)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12, Main Lecture Theatre
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
The Galactic Center is the only nucleus of a galaxy that we can study on milli-parsec scales. It is also the Milky Way?s most extreme environment and most prolific star forming region. I will review the current state of our knowledge about the structure and formation history of the Galactic Center as well as about the properties and open questions of present day star formation in this nearest analogue of a starburst environment. Dr. Schoedel will be based at the Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik for his visit to Heidelberg and will be available for meetings by arrangement with his host, Mattia Sormani (mattia.sormani@uni-heidelberg.de).

2022-06-17
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBA
Anders Johansen (The Globe Institute, Copenhagen)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBA

2022-06-17
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
3D magneto-hydrodynamical model atmospheres: the influence of surface magnetism on the center-to-limb variation of solar-type stars
Hans-Günter Ludwig (LSW)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-06-21
16:00
Add to calendar (ics)
to be arranged
Prof Melissa Ness (Columbia University, USA)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12, Main Lecture Theatre
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
Abstract to be arranged. Prof. Ness will be based at MPIAstronomie for her visit to Heidelberg and will be available for meetings by arrangement with her hosts, Hans-Walter Rix (rix@mpia.de) and Nadine Neumayer (neumayer@mpia.de).

2022-06-23
11:15
Add to calendar (ics)
Stripped stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, and the hunt for their black-hole remnants
Tomer Shenar (University of Amsterdam)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
The ongoing LIGO/VIRGO gravitational-wave detections sparked an international “hunt” for stellar-mass black holes in our own Cosmic neighborhood. Of special interest are black hole components in massive binaries (OB+BH). These systems offer key probes linking between their speculated progenitors – Wolf Rayet binaries – and their possible descendants: black hole mergers. Thousands of OB+BH binaries are expected to reside in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. However, only few are known, usually appearing as X-ray binaries. Multiple reports of OB+BH systems have emerged in the last years, but almost all have been refuted by following studies. Finding such systems will yield precious constraints on core-collapse physics and binary interaction at the upper-mass end. I will start the talk by discussing recent insights on the putative progenitors of black holes: Wolf-Rayet stars, including some open problems regarding their formation. I will continue by highlighting refuted black hole detections, and show how these led to the discovery of a new type of post-interaction binary systems. Finally, I will conclude with current ongoing efforts to find quiescent OB+BH systems using Gaia and spectroscopic techniques, including a few promising candidates.

2022-06-24
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBD
Jingyi Mah (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBD

2022-06-28
16:00
Add to calendar (ics)
Turbulent Beginnings: A Predictive Theory of Star Formation in the Interstellar Medium
Prof Blakesley Burkhart (Rutgers University & Flatiron Institute/CCA, USA)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12, Main lecture theatre
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
Our current view of the interstellar medium (ISM) is as a multiphase environment where magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence affects many key processes: star formation, cosmic ray acceleration, and the evolution of structure in the diffuse ISM. In part 1 of this talk, I shall review the fundamentals of galactic turbulence and discuss progress in developing new techniques for comparing observational data with numerical MHD turbulence simulations. In part 2, I will focus on how turbulence affects the long-standing problem of star formation. From scales of giant molecular clouds (GMCs), I will demonstrate how the star formation efficiency can be analytically calculated from understanding how turbulence, gravity, and stellar feedback induce density fluctuations in the ISM via a probability distribution function analysis. This analytic calculation predicts star formation rates from pc size scales (GMCs) to kpc size scales in galaxies. Prof. Burkhart will be based at the Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik for her visit to Heidelberg and will be available for meetings by arrangement with her host, Ralf Klessen (klessen@uni-heidelberg.de).

2022-06-30
11:15
Add to calendar (ics)
Building a microlensing look at the models of planet formation
Clement Ranc (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
The Galactic Bulge Time Domain Survey of the NASA Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope (launch in 2027) will detect >1000 planets with masses as low as Mars mass around G, K, M stars. The high resolution capability and high precision photometry of the telescope will also yield the mass measure- ments of ∼700 such planets and their host stars during its prime mission. In this talk, I will present the physical concepts and observational techniques behind this space survey, using results already obtained from the ground, including from follow up observations of microlensing events that enable the mass-measurement of cold exoplanets on wide orbits (∼0.5-10 AU). Past microlensing surveys have measured the planet-to-host star mass-ratio function of the cold exoplanets in the Milky Way. When compared to predictions from planet population synthesis models, these observational results question some stages of the models of giant planet formation. After discussing these results, I will present a current program I am working on aiming at convert- ing the aforementioned ‘mass-ratio function’ into a ‘mass function’, which is expected to provide new insights and constraints on the abundance of cold exoplanets, its dependence to the host-star mass and location in the galaxy.

2022-07-01
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBD
Giulia Perotti (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBD

2022-07-01
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBD
Matthias Samland (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBD

2022-07-01
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
3D magneto-hydrodynamical model atmospheres: the influence of surface magnetism on the center-to-limb variation of solar-type stars
Hans-Günter Ludwig (LSW)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-07-05
16:00
Add to calendar (ics)
A cloud-scale view on the star formation process in nearby galaxies
Dr Eva Schinnerer (MPI Astronomie, Heidelberg)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12, main lecture theatre

2022-07-07
11:15
Add to calendar (ics)
The many catalogues of Gaia DR3
Stefan Jordan (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
Every day about five papers are published using Gaia Data Release 2 or Early Data Release 3. Gaia Data Release 3, published on June 13, 2022, will be another source of high-precision data for the astronomical research. The number of stars with 6D phase space information (astrometry plus radial velocities) for stellar dynamical investigations has increased by almost a factor of five, and for the first time more than 100 million low-resolution Bp and Rp spectra become available, providing more detailed information compared to the previous broad-band photometry. Additionally, Gaia DR3 contains special catalogues for multiple stars systems, variable star, and asteroids. Nine performance verification papers, provided by the Gaia DPAC team, demonstrate how to efficiently use the new Gaia catalogue in many different areas of astrophysical research.

2022-07-08
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
ANDES@ELT
Laura Kreidberg (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBD

2022-07-12
16:00
Add to calendar (ics)
The new era of stellar physics
Dr Matteo Cantiello (Center for Computational Astrophysics, Flatiron Institute, USA)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12, main lecture theatre
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
Stellar astrophysics is undergoing a renaissance driven by new observational and theoretical capabilities. Wide-field time-domain surveys have uncovered new classes of stellar explosions, helping to understand how stars evolve and end their lives. Gravitational-wave astronomy is providing exciting insights into the properties of the final remnants of massive stars. Asteroseismology, the study of waves in stars, is also producing dramatic breakthroughs in stellar structure and evolution. Thanks to space astrometry, accurate distances are now available for an unprecedented number of galactic stars. From a theoretical standpoint, it is increasingly possible to study aspects of the three-dimensional structure of stars using targeted numerical simulations. These studies can then be used to develop more accurate models of these physics in one-dimensional stellar evolution codes. I will review some of the most important results in stellar physics of the last few years, and highlight what are the most relevant puzzles that still need to be solved. I will put particular emphasis on the physics of massive stars, which are the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, gamma-ray bursts and the massive compact remnants observed by LIGO. Dr Cantiello will be based at the Heidelberg Institut fuer Theoretische Studien for his visit to Heidelberg and will be available for meetings by arrangement with his hosts, Fabian Schneider (fabian.schneider@h-its.org), Friedrich Roepke (friedrich.roepke@h-its.org) and Saskia Hekker (saskia.hekker@h-its.org).

2022-07-14
11:15
Add to calendar (ics)
First 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of Wolf-Rayet winds and their effects on observations
Luka Poniatowski (Leuven)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
Classical Wolf Rayet (WR) stars are hydrogen-free, late evolutionary stages of massive stars. These stars are direct supernova progenitors and undergo intense mass loss. As such, understanding dense and fast outflows of WR stars is crucial for understanding advanced stages of stellar evolution, the dynamical feedback of massive stars on their environments and the characterisation of the distribution of black hole masses. Given the complex optically thick, non-LTE environment, current insights on on WR outflows are usually made with a spherical 1D calculations. However, we know from observations and theoretical simulations that the winds of WR stars are clumped and thus non-spherical effects likely playing an important role to understand them. In my previous and current work, we are developing the first time-dependent, multi- dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamical models of the extended, optically thick atmospheres and winds of the classical WR stars. To make this feasible, we employed a hybrid opacity model using a combination of tabulated Rosseland mean opacities and enhanced line opacities expected within a supersonic flow, resulting in highly structured, turbulent flows. Performing radiative transfer calculations on the resulting hydrodynamic structure, we characterise some of the first conclusions for the observations of WR stars following from these 3D models.

2022-07-15
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBD
Mateusz Ruszkowski (University of Michigan)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBD

2022-07-19
16:00
Add to calendar (ics)
to be arranged
Dr Shep Doeleman (tbc) (Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University, USA)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12, main lecture theatre

2022-07-21
11:15
Add to calendar (ics)
Analysis of the metallicity of RR Lyrae stars in Milky Way halo structures
Anna Jacyszyn (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
I will present results of a study of properties of RR Lyrae stars in the Milky Way halo substructures. In the analysis we used a newly developed method of estimating metallicity of RR Lyrae stars based on machine learning techniques. Individual metallicites were estimated using each star’s light curve. I will compare our results with other estimates from literature. Moreover, I will also present other properties of Galaxy’s halo substructures that were obtained using RR Lyrae stars sample. The study is based on Gaia DR2 data. (Hopefully) I will also present an update to the project based on Gaia DR3.

2022-07-22
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBD
Thomas Henning (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBD

2022-07-26
16:00
Add to calendar (ics)
to be arranged
Dr James Owen (Imperial College London, UK)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12, main lecture theatre
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
Abstract to be arranged. Dr Owen will be based at MPIAstronomie for his visit to Heidelberg and will be available for meetings by arrangement with his host, Laura Kreidberg (kreidberg@mpia.de).

2022-07-28
11:15
Add to calendar (ics)
Multiphase and multi-scale AGN feedback processes
Dominika Wylezalek (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1, 1.OG
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
AGN feedback is now widely considered to be one of the main drivers in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. In my talk I will describe several efforts in our group to understand the power, reach and impact of AGN feedback processes. We find significant evidence for AGN feedback signatures even in low-luminosity AGN and we are now using molecular gas as a tracer to investigate if and how feedback may impact and quench galaxies at low redshift. At higher redshift, it appears that AGN-driven outflows can indeed suppress star formation in their hosts, consistent with the AGN having a ‘negative’ impact on galaxy evolution. However, both star formation and quasar activity peak at z ∼ 2-3 where AGN are expected to impact the build-up of stellar mass the most and I will present recent efforts in our group to characterise feedback processes in powerful AGN on CGM scales at and near Cosmic Noon. In particular, our team recently discovered a unique population of luminous high-z quasars (ERQs) with extreme outflow properties. At the same time, more and more exotic AGN populations with extreme signatures are being discovered at that redshift. These populations are ideal to obtain a census of the overall mass and energy budget of both outflow and infall/feeding from the CGM, an essential requirement to probe the detailed and full feedback loop. Finally, I will also introduce the JWST ERS Program ”Q3D” which will study the impact of three carefully selected luminous quasars on their hosts. Our program will serve as a pathfinder for JWST science investigations in IFU mode. Depending on JWST’s science schedule, I may show some of the very first JWST science images.

2022-07-29
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBA
Jennifer (Leigh) Wojno (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBA

2022-09-23
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBD
Raphaël Errani (Obs. Strasbourg)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2022-10-07
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
TBD
Ralf Klessen (ITA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
TBD

2022-11-25
11:00
Add to calendar (ics)
Award celebration
Patzer colloquium
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
Show/hide abstract

Abstract
The award winner will present their work.

zum Seitenanfang/up